2012 Breakout Session Descriptions

Monday, November 12 – Morning Breakout Sessions

  • Barbara Roberts and Pat Martin: Preparing for the Pedagogical Shifts Demanded by Common Core Standards
    As districts and schools prepare for the implementation of the Common Core standards, we must consider the shift that will take place in student instruction. CompassLearning has always been about teaching more than rote foundational knowledge and discrete procedures. Our attention to brain research, and how information is retained and applied has resulted in building content that offers vast opportunities for exploration, discovery, critical thinking, analysis, and deep reasoning. Our rigorous content that aligns with NWEA provides a comprehensive solution in readying our students for the 21st century. Learn about the ability to link together NWEA’s computer adaptive test to CompassLearning Odyssey curriculum.
  • Andrew Hegedus: Assessment Literacy in a Teacher Evaluation Frame
    At times, gaps in educators’ understanding of assessment data limit the depth of dialogue about the implications of all kinds of uses for data. More and more often, people are considering including assessment data as a piece of a formal teacher evaluation process. This is a new and complicated area into which educators are beginning to tread. Using a framework for using data in teacher evaluations, we will reinforce some of what you know about assessment data, answer some questions you may have and deepen your understanding of the strengths and limitations of assessment data.
  • Neely Kelly: On the Edge of Glory: Integrating Google Chromebooks in the Classroom
    Participants will learn of the various ways teachers are using Google Chromebooks, Google Drive, and free apps to enhance learning in the classroom. How the use of these devices makes grading, collaboration, and tracking student progress easier. Participants will learn steps to take as they begin to implement mobile devices into the classroom and how the Google Management Console works. Participants will receive a handout of apps by subject area.
  • Davina Walker: Engaging and Assessing 21st Century Learners Their Way
    Come and see how to assess and enhance your learning environment for 21st century learners using technology and social networking. The workshop will teach you how to use web based programs and IPAD apps to reach all learners. Tools to be explored are Edmodo, Socrative, Screencast-o-matic, Educreations, and much more. You will learn how to change the dynamics of your class from traditional assessments and instructional practices to 21st century methods. Workshop participants will need a laptop and/or IPAD to participate. Come and get the true experience of learning the 21st century way. Workshop is geared towards middle school students and up.

Monday, November 12 – Afternoon Breakout Sessions A

  • Michael P. Dahlin: VCG 1.5: Improved Analytics for Evaluating Student Growth and Program Effectiveness
    Outlines the new metrics and analytics to be included in NWEA’s Virtual Comparison Group reports (or VCG 1.5), along with examples and illustrations of how the improved reports can be used for evaluation of school and programmatic effectiveness.
  • Denise Miles: Getting Our Student “On Track” With onTRAC!
    Teachers have multiple forms of data at their fi ngertips but, how can all of these numbers make a difference in the day-to-day operation of the classroom? How can teachers really understand what students know and are able to do, and how will this information affect instruction? Data is only useful when it is accessible and comprehensible. “What do all of these numbers mean?” was a frequent question echoing through the halls of our school. Two years ago Creek Bridge Middle/High School fi rst implemented quarterly school-wide benchmarks in all four core subject areas using Interactive Achievement’s onTRAC software. The software delivers standard-aligned content, assessments, and instant reports for precise analysis of student achievement. OnTRAC has helped our teachers easily and instantly pinpoint student successes and weaknesses and provides our administrators and teachers with an accurate assessment of student performance throughout the school year. Because the data needed to make important curriculum decisions is provide immediately, we do not have to wait for the high stakes end-of-year tests to find out how our students are performing. With onTRAC our teachers know how our students are doing in “real time” and can make any necessary adjustments in their instruction and provide immediate and targeted remediation for our students. This presentation will provide participants with key details on how we implemented the onTRAC system at our school and how it has been used to effectively monitor student progress, improve student achievement, and transform data analysis at the classroom level.
  • Sonya Archie: Data’s Done! Now What do I Teach?
    Now that all the student assessments and data are complete, what does it all mean for instruction? Small group lessons and ideas for Responses to Intervention in the classroom.
  • Amy G. Young: Going Beyond Verbs to Cognitive Complexity
    Take a step toward the SMARTER Balanced Assessments by familiarizing yourself with the Cognitive Rigor Matrix. Learn how Bloom’s (revised) Taxonomy of Educational Objectives and Webb’s Depth-of-Knowledge (DOK) Levels have joined forces to identify the cognitive rigor of lesson planning, instruction, and assessment items and tasks.

Monday, November 12 – Afternoon Breakout Sessions B

  • Ben Bache: Tricks of the Common Core and Smarter Balanced
    You know the basics about what’s coming with Common Core and Smarter Balanced, but there are still a lot of things that have you wondering. This session will help expose a few of those secrets (a few things we’ll look at are some prevailing myths, the truth about the Technology-Enhanced Assessments, and the impact of the Instructional Shifts… and much more).
  • Laura Riley: NWEA and the New Common Core Assessments
    How will the Common Core be measured using NWEA’s MAP tests? Most frequently asked questions about the tests and reports will be addressed.
  • Lauren Lavenia: Painless Protocols for Prioritizing the CCSS
    The introduction and implementation of new standards can be a highly stressful shift for teachers. In order to plan for this shift, it is critical that teachers develop a clear and deep understanding of the CCSS and the expectations that accompany each standard. The protocols developed in Lexington School District One provide a specific and easy process for faculties to collaboratively dissect the standards, evaluate priorities, and begin framing curriculum development.
  • Allison Batten Jacques: The University of South Carolina College of Education’s Role in Supporting Common Core Initiatives
    Representatives from the University Of South Carolina College Of Education will highlight efforts across the college to support Common Core initiatives through collaboration with state and national leaders. Specific strategies and resources will be shared.

Tuesday, November 13 – Afternoon Breakout Sessions C

  • Michael P. Dahlin: A Level Playing Field? How College Readiness Standards Change the Accountability Game
    In our study, A Level Playing Field, we found that the top tenth in high-poverty schools lag behind their more affluent peers on performance measures of college readiness, but their growth trajectories are comparable and show they do not lose ground over time. Given the emphasis of accountability systems on raising the lowest performing students to profi ciency, the challenges associated with poverty, and the differences in resources, in many ways high-poverty schools are to be commended. Nevertheless, the achievement gaps between these groups of high performing students are large and they are certain to persist over time if intentional efforts are not undertaken to narrow the gap. To illustrate the likely impact of the gaps among our high achievers, we projected the performance of our middle schoolers relative to the eligibility standards employed by several states (primarily in the South) that offer merit aid that depends, in part, on a student’s ACT score. In For Whom the Pell Tolls, we found the students attending high-poverty schools had far lower rates of scholarship eligibility than the students attending low-poverty schools and that the gaps in eligibility generally increased as the ACT eligibility score was raised. In South Carolina, a state with a relatively high eligibility score requirement, the eligibility gap between students from high- and low-poverty schools reached 30%, and that gap, projected across our sample meant that students in high-poverty schools projected to receive $5 million less in scholarship aid from the South Carolina program than students coming from low-poverty schools.
  • Laura Riley: NWEA and the New Common Core Assessments
    How will the Common Core be measured using NWEA’s MAP tests? Most frequently asked questions about the tests and reports will be addressed.
  • Amy G. Young: Going Beyond Verbs to Cognitive Complexity
    Take a step toward the SMARTER Balanced Assessments by familiarizing yourself with the Cognitive Rigor Matrix. Learn how Bloom’s (revised) Taxonomy of Educational Objectives and Webb’s Depth-of-Knowledge (DOK) Levels have joined forces to identify the cognitive rigor of lesson planning, instruction, and assessment items and tasks.
  • John Cronin: Improving the Validity of Your Test Results
    As the states around testing increase, it becomes more and more important to maintain consistent test conditions that will assure results are as accurate as possible. This presentation will provide suggestions for improving validity and provide data that illustrates validity issues.

Tuesday, November 13 – Afternoon Breakout Sessions D

  • Lee Westbury: Being “Common” Can Be Unique
    This session will teach participants how to plan a common core unit with coordinating benchmark assessment. Also, a delivery system to share information school-wide will be shared.
  • Evan Lefsky: Using Common Assessments to Calibrate Expectations
    PCG Education has developed an Assessment Alignment Protocol and accompanying tools to facilitate the development of summative measures of learning at the end of a lesson and formative measures to be used during instruction. This combination supports effective differentiated instruction and success for all learners.
  • Andy Hegedus: District and School Improvement — A New NWEA Tool Looking at Longitudinal Patterns
    NWEA believes that school and district performance improves with the wise use of data. To accomplish this, two things are required: 1) Information generated from data needs to be analyzed in rigorous ways with the strengths and limitations of the analysis well understood; and 2) the decision making process utilizing the information needs to be structured to gather organizational wisdom and apply it appropriately. This session will review the latest services from NWEA designed to meet both of these requirements. This session is designed for district level and school administrators who are involved in improvement activities.
  • Gale Whitfield: OMI (Opening Minds Through Innovation)
    Innovative techniques that have increased students interest in science, math, and social studies which has improved their standardize test scores in one year.

Tuesday, November 13 – Afternoon Breakout Sessions E

  • Michael P. Dahlin: Making AYP in SC: Supplemental PASS/MAP Linking Study Tied to the Annual Measurable Objectives Under South Carolina’s ESEA Waiver
    In this session, we present the methods and findings from a supplemental linking study between the scales of PASS and NWEA’s MAP tests, based on the updated annual measurable objectives as outlined in the South Carolina ESEA waiver. Cut scores by grade, subject, and academic year are presented, along with some general guidelines on how to make use of the study.
  • Ben Bache: Tricks of the Common Core and Smarter Balanced
    You know the basics about what’s coming with Common Core and Smarter Balanced, but there are still a lot of things that have you wondering. This session will help expose a few of those secrets (a few things we’ll look at are some prevailing myths, the truth about the Technology-Enhanced Assessments, and the impact of the Instructional Shifts… and much more).
  • Allison Batten Jacques: The University of South Carolina College of Education’s Role in Supporting Common Core Initiatives
    Representatives from the University of South Carolina College Of Education will highlight efforts across the college to support Common Core initiatives through collaboration with state and national leaders. Specific strategies and resources will be shared.

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